Posts Tagged ‘YouTube’

It just so happens that I am a fan of Epic Meal Time Рthe YouTube internet cooking show devoted to  putting as much fat and calories as humanly possible into meat-based entrees.

It’s a pretty simple premise, kind of like Cheesecake Factory Gone Wild set to The Terminator soundtrack.

All I want for Christmas...

All I want for Christmas…

Taste seems to be a side issue. It’s calories and fat. And bacon strips and bacon strips and bacon strips and bacon strips and bacon strips…

I doubt I would have stumbled onto EpicMealTime on my own. No, I needed the knuckleheads at CFCP to turn me on to something this…this…this…profoundly odd.

I probably wouldn’t have noticed the guys watching and Epic Meal Time clip because if they’re not working-out they’re standing around the large computer screen mounted on the wall looking at YouTube videos of:

1. How to do a particular lift and the unfortunate consequences of doing it wrong

2. Reruns of the CrossFit games

3. Random weird stuff

4. Butts – specifically the butts of women who obviously do LOTS of squats

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I am feeling like quite the badass today. Chain deadlifts will do that to a girl.

I had no idea what a chain deadlift was when my coach, Matt, emailed me my workouts. He was on vacation and I didn’t want to bother him, so I went on YouTube and found a video of some guy doing chain deadlifts.

Chain deadlifts, as demonstrated by someone who knows what he is doing

Chain deadlifts, as demonstrated by someone who knows what he is doing

Basically, it’s a deadlift with big, heavy chains dangling 0ff the barbell. It’s the kind of lift you should do while wearing one of those black leather face masks. It’s that badass. Unfortunately, I don’t have a black leather face mask. Still, I’m quite sure I looked like a badass anyway.

At the bottom of the deadlift, the chains are coiled up on the floor and the weight is the lightest. As you lift the bar and the chains begin to come off the floor, the weight increases and more resistance is created. Without resistance, lifters tend to decelerate toward the top of the lift.

The theory is that adding resistance challenges your strength levels at the top of the range of motion. At the bottom of the deadlift, the chains are coiled up on the floor and the weight is the lightest. As you lift the bar and the chains begin to come off the floor, the weight increases and more resistance is created. Without resistance, lifters tend to decelerate toward the top of the lift. (more…)